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Everything you need to know before moving to Brazil

Portuguese is the national language in Brazil. Given Brazil’s population, it’s the largest Lusophone country in the world. On the same note, it’s also responsible for Portuguese being one of the major languages in the world.

Brazilian Portuguese has become so popular that it’s overtaken the classic Portuguese in Portugal as well.

 The people moving to Brazil and Brazil expats don’t necessarily need to speak the language, but it would help while trying to get used to Brazilian culture.

Chances are lots of people speak decent English in major cities too, so many expats discover the language as they blend in. With time, they’re usually able to speak Portuguese at a decent level.

Climate condition in Brazil

Brazil is one of the most popular expat destinations because of its weather. It’s a massive country, and weather varies from north to south, but most of it is located in tropical areas.

Generally speaking, temperatures are less likely to go under 68 degrees F, apart from a few regions in the south or mountainous areas. It’s usually dry and hot in the central part of the country, while rainforests bring in a sticky and humid climate.

There’s a rainy season, too, and things can get pretty wet. You’ll need both lightweight natural fabric clothes and waterproof clothes.

Those looking for permanent residency will get used to the weather and seasons within their first year in the country.

Brazillian culture differences

Brazil is one of the most diversified countries in South America. São Paulo is Brazil’s largest city, followed closely by Rio de Janeiro. What makes this country special among other South American countries is the fact that most of the population is descended from immigrants.

At the same time, there are still untouched indigenous tribes roaming local jungles, hence the impressive variety.

A simple one-bedroom apartment will cost more in a big city than in a small one, but prices also vary based on location in the city. Places close to the central or touristy areas will cost more. Look for accommodation over Facebook groups or local estate agents.

Nearly half of all rental agreements are found in online or newspaper ads.

It will take a bit of time to get your head around it, but you’ll love the change.

Despite all these different populations, there are a few general things you should do or avoid in Brazil, as well as other South American countries.

For example, soccer is a religion. After all, Brazil has won the World Cup five times, more than any other country. It has some of the most talented soccer players in the world. Be respectful about it.

You need to be warm and open, as Brazilians interact a lot. Be open about invitations to different activities too, such as soccer. Brazilians are compassionate and serious about family life, so always inquire about family when talking to someone.

Hand gestures have different meanings, so avoid them. Don’t discuss politics, religion, or poverty. Avoid praising Argentina, too, and never consider a Brazilian national to be Hispanic. Being late is normal, up to half an hour.

Avoid race discussions, and don’t be offended if you’re referred to as a gringo. It’s not an insult. Instead, the word refers to foreigners. Refrain from blasphemy and cursing too.

Given the high Portuguese influence, Brazil has a generally Western culture, but it retains some of its cultural characteristics as well.

Is same-sex marriage legal in Brazil? Yes, and widely accepted, yet same-sex marriage may also be a taboo topic in some small communities.

Visa and residency requirements for moving to Brazil

Whether you’re after a permanent visa, tourist and business visa, or you’re after a Brazilian passport, Brazilian authorities are pretty strict, so you need to be familiar with Brazilian law.

From this point of view, it might be wiser to rely on a Brazilian company for immigration.

Sure, most types of visas, such as tourist visas, are straightforward. But if you have a more difficult situation or you want to live in Brazil indefinitely for its local culture, booming economy, or a retirement visa, you should find a specialized agent.

All in all, whether or not you need a visa when you enter Brazil depends on your nationality and purpose.

On the same note, temporary visas and permanent visas represent the most common requests.

Reach out to a local Brazilian consulate or local embassy if you’re not sure what you need. There are normally two types of visas:

  • VIVIS, mostly aimed at tourists and allows a maximum stay of up to 90 days.
  • VITEM, which is aimed at those who need more than 90 days in Brazil.

Each of them has different subcategories.

You’ll need a VIVIS visa if you’re after private healthcare or you need to get treated in the public health care system, you have a temporary employment contract, you’re after a working holiday visa, you’re just visiting, attending a few business meetings or you’re there for a sports competition, among many others.

On the other hand, VITEM visas are suitable for those after the Brazilian economy, those who have found a Brazilian employer, studying in international schools, business visas for long term business, investment visa, long term work visa, or if you’re interested to move to Brazil.

Even if you seek employment, you may need more than just 90 days. In fact, you should aim for a residence permit. Most expats have started with this visa before going for Brazilian citizenship.

Different situations have different requirements. The economic growth or business purpose may require some bank statements, or your financial capital will be checked first. You may need to get a Brazilian bank account, too, for business.

It makes no difference if you’re after business in southern Brazil, a tourism business in Porto Alegre, or a startup in São Paulo. A criminal record check might be required for visas longer than 90 days or different types of residence.

A health insurance isn’t required, but helpful. Most foreign nationals have one.

You don’t always need to get to a Brazilian embassy to ask for a visa. For example, citizens of the USA don’t need a visa for tourism or other activities. You don’t need a temporary visa if you stay less than 90 days. You can also extend the duration for another 90 days on request.

For a long term visa, you may have to save money and show a statement of your bank account. It doesn’t have to be a Brazilian bank, though. You’ll require a valid passport too.

A permanent visa will be given to foreigners who intend to live in Brazil for more than two years. Later on, you can become a Brazilian citizen. If you plan to stay for up to two years only, you won’t be given a permanent visa.

Other expat destinations in South America have similar rules. Even if you choose to go to another country or a different popular expat destination, permanent visas are more difficult to obtain.

Political and economic situation

The Brazilian real economy is among the world’s fastest growing economies. It’s a contrast because, to some people, Brazil is also the most dangerous country in South America. With all these, there are many foreign companies in the country.

Just like everywhere else, there are safe areas, as well as areas in poverty struggling with violent crime. Despite being a dangerous country, most foreigners take advantage of the growing economy and stick to popular places for tourists and safe areas only.

The local economy is the third most significant one in the Americas. In 2022, Brazil has the 12th largest GDP in the world, as well as the eighth largest purchasing power parity.

Over the past few years, Brazilian democracy has been exposed to stress due to a bit of instability. Support for democracy in Brazil exceeds 75% though, so there are no reasons to be concerned about.

Why choose Nobel Relocation for your move to Brazil from the US?

– Because we are professionals and specialists in International Moves and Relocation.

– Because our services cover nearly the entire globe.

– Because our worldwide agencies are present in 186 countries.

– Because we are proud of our record—100% satisfied customers!

 
For updated Covid-19 regulations please contact our representatives

Are you planning a move from the USA to Brazil? Look no further, as our team is here to help make your transition as smooth and stress-free as possible.

Our team of experienced professionals has extensive knowledge of the moving process to Brazil and will guide you through every step. We offer a range of services, including packing and crating, shipping, customs clearance, and delivery to your new home.

We understand that moving to a new country can be overwhelming, which is why we take care of all the details for you. Our team will handle all of the necessary documentation and ensure that your belongings arrive safely and on time.

In addition to our moving services, we also offer assistance with finding temporary or permanent housing in Brazil. Our team has connections with real estate agents and can help you find the perfect home for you and your family.

Don’t let the stress of moving to Brazil weigh you down. Let our team handle the details while you focus on starting your new life in this vibrant and exciting country. Contact us today to learn more and get started on your move to Brazil.

There is a very large Brazilian community in South Florida and particularly in Miami therefore Nobel Relocation decided to build a separate department in the company that will specialize in that market.

We hired experienced people to establish business relations with the top companies in Brazil. As an established leader in the international moving industry, we have excellent connections with agents in Brazil that will assure a great Door to Door service to our customers.

We at Nobel have a representative that understands the Brazilian culture and speaks their native language and welcomes you to request a FREE onsite estimate for your upcoming move. We are also proud members of the American Chamber of Commerce of Florida where we meet with the community.

Brazil is a vast South American country that stretches from the Amazon Basin in the north to vineyards and massive Iguacu Falls in the south. A tropical country that calls attention to its abundance of natural green nature and blue waters.

Brazilians all year round prepare themselves for the early Carnival event and also with the same determination cheer for their soccer stars and the national team consistently among the best in the world.

NORTHEAST BRAZIL

The Northeast is one of loveliest, land of sunny beaches, colonial towns, vibrating street parties, music everywhere, and very friendly people

It’s the gateway for lovers of nature and sports. Northeast has the most stunning cost line in South America.

Rio de Janeiro is one of the most visited cities in the Southern Hemisphere and is known for its natural settings, Carnival, Samba, Bossa Nova, and Balneario beaches, where you can find the most gorgeous scenery.

Sitting on the beach and having a delicious caipirinha while participating in a soccer or volleyball game while watching the girls go by is a perfect combination.

São Paulo, The city is the capital of the surrounding state of São Paulo, the most populous and wealthiest state in Brazil. It exerts strong international influences in commerce, finance, arts, and entertainment.

Having the largest economy in Latin America and the Southern Hemisphere, the city is home to the São Paulo Stock Exchange. Paulista Avenue is the economic core of São Paulo.

The metropolis is also home to several of the tallest skyscrapers in Brazil The city has cultural, economic, and political influence both nationally and internationally.

São Paulo is a cosmopolitan, melting pot city, home to the largest Arab, Italian, and Japanese.

When visiting don’t miss the extraordinary gastronomic international cuisine center.

ARE YOU MOVING FROM BRAZIL TO THE USA? – PRESS HERE

EMBASSY OF BRAZIL – WASHINGTON DC

3006 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20008
Tel: 202-238-2700
 

BRAZIL CONSULATE GENERAL IN MIAMI, FL

3150 SW 38th Ave

Miami, FL 33146
TEL – 305 373 1889
FAX – 305-285-6200

EMAIL – assistencia.miami@itamaraty.gov.br

BRAZIL CONSULATE GENERAL IN ATLANTA, GA

3500 Lenox Rd NE #800
Atlanta, GA 30326
TEL – 404-949-2400
EMAIL – eleitoral.atlanta@itamaraty.gov.br

 

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